There’s a story that I’ve been keeping from you. Something very tragic. It started when I entered Austria on the 28th of April. I endured the most horrific thing to ever happen in the history of everything: The cell phone guy was without cell phone service for three weeks.

This incredibly long, very complicated story forced me to expand my knowledge of mobile devices, apps, and alternative ways of thinking about a better international cell phone plan. Furthermore, I had to learn and trouble shoot all of this while traveling internationally.

The question that I had to ask myself was: How do I keep the same American cell phone number that I’ve had for about 15 years, change carriers while traveling internationally, and still keep the price of international cell phone use down?

Since I’ve only recently solved this problem, I plan on telling you more about the solution that I’ve found after 1-3 months of use. That way, I’ll be sure it’s working properly, and in multiple countries.

I’ve found a way to get:

  1. 9GB of data/month in Thailand (plus, unlimited, throttled data after 9GB is exceeded)
  2. 200 calls and/or texts to/from a local Thai phone number that works on my cell phone
  3. While also being able to call and text to and from my normal American phone number on the same cell phone (ie: two phone numbers working on one cell phone)

Now you’re asking, “but what’s the price/month for this international cell phone plan, Vince?” In Thailand, that price would be: 850 Baht ($22.43) + $0.85 + $0.01/minute for non-local calls.

      Obviously, the price and limit for data will be different for different countries. Still, this solution can be used for any American with an Android or Apple smartphone, whether you’re using your phone in the US, traveling in the short term, or traveling long term. There’s likely a way to do this on a Windows phone, too. I’ll have to research that.

      As for non-Americans, I’d safely assume there’s a way to make this happen in your home country. After 1-3 months of experimentation and testing, when I write that blog post that I mentioned above, I’ll research one country as an example.

      I’ve conquered the cell phone

      From the 28th of April through the 21st of June (I settled for a temporary fix after three weeks), I was working on this off and on, while still experiencing each country that I visited. Now I’m finished. I can’t tell you how relieved that I am, and how excited I’ll be to share this whole process with you when the time is right.

      Join my email list today to be the first to know when I release what I’ve found and take you through, step by step, how to make this happen for you.